My 1956 Trojan Sea Queen restoration project

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61SkiBee
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Post by 61SkiBee »

Thanks for the pictures and documentation on what types of materials you used. That's good information for restorers! You have more patience than I do for varnishing, but the 14 coats really show off the beauty of the wood.

It looks like you have the molded plywood hull. That marine plywood seems to be very durable. However, I had to replace some pieces of mahogany decking, particularly one section of gunwale near the transom. Did you need to replace any? It seems the mahogany is susceptible to dry or wet rot.

Did you need to caulk the seams in the bottom? I wound up doing just about all of them. It looks like the transom was the most work for you. One pic looks like you're pouring some resin in the corner. There are some places in the center seam (the "devil") near the bow on mine that had this treatment. I'm replacing some of it with 3M marine sealant, which is supposed to be tough enough for structural work. That's my next project--two bulkheads in front have to be removed to get to the entire seam.

It's great you were able to rescue your Dad's old boat. That makes it all the sweeter. It found a good home!
Guy Strauss

"Das Boot"
'61 SkiBee, 17' Inboard Runabout ski tow
Ford 292 Interceptor (pictured)

NYRaider
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Post by NYRaider »

61SkiBee wrote:Thanks for the pictures and documentation on what types of materials you used. That's good information for restorers! You have more patience than I do for varnishing, but the 14 coats really show off the beauty of the wood.

It looks like you have the molded plywood hull. That marine plywood seems to be very durable. However, I had to replace some pieces of mahogany decking, particularly one section of gunwale near the transom. Did you need to replace any? It seems the mahogany is susceptible to dry or wet rot.

Did you need to caulk the seams in the bottom? I wound up doing just about all of them. It looks like the transom was the most work for you. One pic looks like you're pouring some resin in the corner. There are some places in the center seam (the "devil") near the bow on mine that had this treatment. I'm replacing some of it with 3M marine sealant, which is supposed to be tough enough for structural work. That's my next project--two bulkheads in front have to be removed to get to the entire seam.

It's great you were able to rescue your Dad's old boat. That makes it all the sweeter. It found a good home!


The decking didn't need any replacement, just a good sanding. I did run into one wet spot under the paint...above the water line in the transom. I left it open to the air and it dried, I then checked it and it seemed solid. The transom is a laminated three piece part. So I let it be.
As for the fiberglass...I replaced the two panels of fiberglass and added 4 others for a total of 6. The last three sections to each side between the runners and the sides. I had to sand this till the wood was clear, and then I wiped it with lacquer thinner and poured the fiberglass in. Some sections I had to redo as the bond to the wood was difficult to achieve.
Caulking the bottom was not needed, but I did add some to the bow line.

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61SkiBee
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Post by 61SkiBee »

You were fortunate with the seams. It sounds like the boat has a good solid bottom structure. Mine had fiberglass matte added to the outside of the bottom at some point. A poor job, as they did not remove the keel or the stabilizer strips. I had to remove all that, sand the entire bottom down to the fiberglass matte, add a coat of resin, then lightly sand again and paint (after adding a coat of Interlux AL 200 fiberglass primer to help the paint adhere). Lots of work. But bedding the keel in solid was satisfying. It's a strip of white oak. I painted the entire hull with Interlux High Intensity Gloss White enamel. It didn't require anti-fouling paint because it's trailered. I found the paint to be very durable.

I noticed in your pic of the inside of the bottom that you have individual boards lenghtwise across the center section. Does this consitute the floor? Mine has a plywood bottom with cross-hatched reinforcements and then separate floor pieces that screw onto the stringers for a "false bottom." It gives a flat floor throughout.

If you have pictures of the inside with the seats in place, I'd like to see how they are arranged. I just have a front and rear, with the engine "doghouse" sitting in the middle with an upholstered cover you can sit on. The outboard arrangement on yours must give a lot of added interior space. I also have a convertible top, but the fabric and clear vinyl windows are all shot--it's just a pattern for now. They're pricey to replace.

The caulking on your topside turned out beautifully. What did you use? I'll have to get busy and scan some pictures. I had a whole series of shots that were posted by the web site, but they apparently discontinued this service and the pics are gone.
Guy Strauss

"Das Boot"
'61 SkiBee, 17' Inboard Runabout ski tow
Ford 292 Interceptor (pictured)

NYRaider
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Post by NYRaider »

Yes, I have that white oak strip down the center inside. That was fine except for a little discoloring...some light sanding is all that was required. I do have individual boards running the length inside on the floor, then the plywood bottom with two runners half the length. Thats all the floor I remember when I was a kid in the early 60's. You may have something added aftermarket.

The seats, the front and the back are screwed down to side runners...then there's the plank seat near the outboard that's removable.
The canopy...well it wasn't done quite right (the snaps don't line up) so
the canvas place is redoing it...I do have the clear vinyl tri-angles windows for it, but redoing those will wait till spring.

The calking I used is Boatlife Life-Calk. Its a cross between the common putty type and silicon. Easy to go on and tried white, it was a little pliable and easy to sand. The varnish turned it into a deep yellow.

For the overcoat on the outside I used Interlux "Brightside" polyurethane...It went on thick and smoothed out fast. I put two coats down and I only caught 3 runs.

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61SkiBee
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Post by 61SkiBee »

The floorboards are original in mine. Without them, you'd be tripping over things, especially the two huge oak stringers that double as the engine supports. The inboards are quite different in the interior bottom design. The floorboards themselves are pretty massive: 3/16" (I think) plywood, covered on top with heavy no-slip vinyl or rubber.

The underside shot you show looks like there is no exterior keel. I think the inboard's fixed prop and rudder setup needs it to compensate for the lack of fine directional control.

I might look for that Interlux poly paint. I don't think they had it when I did mine--just good old alkyd enamel. It's durable, but it does get dull and chalky after while. I had good luck with Boatlife Caulk (the regular kind) on my interior seams, but went with Sikaflex to "bed" the chines and the keel. That's good stuff! The 3M sealant/adhesive seems to be more readily available, though. I have some tubes for the center seam work inside the bow. Wonder if I can still fit my bulk under the deck--I was a few sizes smaller the last time.

By the way, I've found that careful restoration lasts a long time on these tough old boats. It has been 15 years since I did the major stuff. Your hard work will pay off!
Guy Strauss

"Das Boot"
'61 SkiBee, 17' Inboard Runabout ski tow
Ford 292 Interceptor (pictured)

NYRaider
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Post by NYRaider »

As a follow up...
I've named the boat, "The Phoenix". It just won Best outboard at the 25th Long Island Antique and Classic boat show.

Beating out 6 Chris Crafts, one Century and a Thompson.


My Trojan is the 2nd to last on the row, with the 1958 Johnson 18Hp
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The Competition
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The Award
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61SkiBee
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Post by 61SkiBee »

Wow, congratulations. "Trojan beats Chris Craft in competition." I like that! I have an old article somewhere about the Trojan wood runabouts competing successfully in east coast performance competitions. I'll try to dig it out and scan it for you.

Good going!

Guy
Guy Strauss

"Das Boot"
'61 SkiBee, 17' Inboard Runabout ski tow
Ford 292 Interceptor (pictured)

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61SkiBee
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Post by 61SkiBee »

Hey NY! You got another boat going yet? The energy you put into restos, you probably have a fleet.
Guy Strauss

"Das Boot"
'61 SkiBee, 17' Inboard Runabout ski tow
Ford 292 Interceptor (pictured)

c abbott
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restoration

Post by c abbott »

beautiful job and I'm sure worth the effort you should be proud
1972 trojan

NYRaider
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Post by NYRaider »

Thanks!
As for another...not yet. I'm enjoying beating the chriscrafts..3 years running...best outboard LI Antique Classic Boat Show.

NYRaider
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Re: My 1956 Trojan Sea Queen restoration project

Post by NYRaider »

Im still beating chriscrafts :)

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prowlersfish
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Re: My 1956 Trojan Sea Queen restoration project

Post by prowlersfish »

That boat is looking good !
TROJAN F36 Conv.
6BTA Cummins diesels
Life is to short for a ugly boat :D
2009 TROJAN RENDEZVOUS
Port Kinsale 2010 & 2011. Solomons get together 2011.

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Re: My 1956 Trojan Sea Queen restoration project

Post by Moderator »

NYRaider wrote:Im still beating chriscrafts :)
As you should :D
Any up dates ?
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